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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
the u.s. postal service says delivering the mail on saturdays must stop. if they are to survive. it's one of two american institutions in the news tonight for differing reasons in changing times. we want to begin tonight with nbc's tom costello in glen echo, maryland. tom, good evening. >> reporter: hi, brian, no secret the postal service is up to its neck in red ink, handling 30 billion fewer pieces of first class mail today than just four years ago. and guess what? delivery of packages booming because we're all buying stuff online. this action is about just trying to keep the lights on. for people all over america, like 71-year-old lois sexton in tennessee, that mailbox at the end of the driveway has been a reliable connection to the rest of the world. >> that's my communication with the people i have my retirement with, my social security. >> reporter: since 1863, six days a week, rain or shine, letters, bills, government checks, newspapers, even movies, have arrived, even on saturday. now the 21st century with its e-mail, e-cards and e-pay, has come knocking. >> we cannot put ou
evening. the coroner's office will use dental records or forensics to identify christopher dorner. they say his body is burned beyond recognition, but law enforcement sources tell nbc news, make no doubt, this is the suspect. tonight, this rubble is all that remains of the cabin where fugitive christopher dorner made his last stand. the drama began tuesday afternoon, miles away. 12:20 p.m., a 911 call from this cabin. two women who arrived to clean the home surprised dorner who was holed up inside. he tied them up and stole their car. >> did we get a physical on the guy? what is he wearing? >> reporter: dressed in camouflage and armed, dorner drove down a mountain road. he opened fire on fish and wildlife wardens in pursuit. >> the suspect took his weapon out, stuck it out the window of his vehicle, and shot our game warden five times. >> reporter: dorner crashed the car, then carjacked rick heltebrake. >> he pointed a gun at me, i an assault-type rifle. i stopped my truck, put it in park, raised my hands up. he said, "i don't want to hurt you. just get out." >> reporter: but dorn
to follow developments in this case and joins us again tonight from pretoria. michelle? >> reporter: good evening, lester. oscar pistorius has been in jail here now for four days. tonight, his agent just canceled all of his upcoming races, while the press here has been full of reports quoting police sources about what allegedly happened inside his home early that morning. for oscar pistorius, another day in jail brought visits again from his sister, a local preacher -- >> he was starting to cry, the colonel telling him i come to pray with him. >> reporter: also today his agent. >> the nature of my visit was on a professional matter to discuss obviously his career, especially the plans we had made for this year. also to visit him as a friend and give him my moral support. >> reporter: the press here has been overflowing with every detail they can find, newspapers quote police sources now, saying they believe reeva steencamp was first shot in pistorius' bedroom, then through the bathroom door, that he then apparently broke through to try to help her, that a cricket bat is now considered a k
against u.s. companies. >> reporter: why is china so aggressive? >> china needs to maintain a very high rate of economic development to keep their citizens happy, to keep their citizens willing to tolerate the kind of oppressive government they've got. >> reporter: president obama signed an executive order last week permitting intelligence agencies to share classified threat data with targeted companies. and calling for voluntary standards to protect vital sectors. banking, the power grid, transportation from attacks. many from china. congress refused to pass legislation last year to improve cyber defenses. republicans objected to new regulations and civil liberties groups worried about privacy. how vulnerable is america? only today the state department is investigating whether one of its associated websites was hacked last night by the activist group known as "anonymous." the attorney general today quoted cyber security experts as saying america now has two types of companies. those who know they have been hacked and those who don't know it yet. brian? >> andrea mitchell in our d.c. ne
of a big u.s. city. the blast felt a mile away. tonight, they're still digging through what's left. >>> storm warning. a huge winter system on the move. a dangerous mix in 18 states, 30 million americans in the path of this one. >>> and hoop dreams for the unlikely star of the high school basketball team crushing the competition, though he's just about half their size. "nightly news" begins now. >>> from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with brian williams. >>> good evening. growing up in this country, you get accustomed to hearing the united states is the greatest nation on earth and the mightiest military force on the planet. what we don't like is feeling vulnerable, the way we do after we have been attacked. and now that we have learned of a massive cyber attack, electronic espionage allegedly at the hands of a branch of the chinese military, and the kind of attack we've been warned about for years, today the white house took action. the problem is, this wake-up call has already hit a slew of big companies, and could reach into our power grid,
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)